Residential Protest Deadline will be on May 31st 2017 at 5:00 pm.

 

Please note:  May 31st is the protest deadline unless the notice of appraised value for your property was dated / mailed by TAD after May 1, 2017. The deadline for filing a timely protest is Wednesday, May 31, 2017, at 5:00 p.m. Central Daylight Time.  If you attempt to protest using eAccess at TAD.org but fail to receive an immediate protest confirmation by email, file a written notice of protest with the Tarrant Appraisal Review Board, PO BOX 185519, Fort Worth, TX 76181-0519, which must be postmarked no later than May 31, 2017, to preserve your rights to a hearing.  A hard copy protest form is printed on the reverse side of your notice of appraised value and an electronic version is available on this website.  Don’t wait until the last minute to file – technical difficulties that may be encountered at TAD.org due to website traffic will not extend the filing deadline.

Resolve Your 2017 Proposed Market Value

 

DID YOU KNOW…

…that you may be able to resolve the 2017 proposed market value of your property without having to attend a hearing? The “Discuss Your Value” option on TAD.org allows you to enter an opinion of market value for your property:

 

Your opinion of market value may be accepted or countered (though in some rare cases TAD may not be able to make you an offer online). If your market value is accepted, or if you accept the counter offer, your market value will be set to the agreed amount and you’re all done!

If your value is not accepted, or no counter offer is made, you do not need to do anything further – your protest is already on file with the Appraisal Review Board. You will be notified of your hearing date and time at least 15 days before the hearing. Please note that the “File a Protest” option only allows you to file a protest. Although you can enter an opinion of value, the system will not make a value offer.

For more information, please contact the Tarrant Appraisal District at (817) 284-3925.

Hot real estate market reflected in 2017 sales prices

According to recent sales data, Tarrant County continues to be one of the hottest real estate markets in the country, and Tarrant Appraisal District (TAD) officials are preparing local home owners for strong property valuations in 2017. 

New residents continue to flood into North Texas seeking jobs and the Texas lifestyle, which means homes are in high demand. When evaluating residential markets, the usual home inventory is about six months, according to the Texas A&M Real Estate Center. However, inventory levels in Tarrant County currently stand at less than two months.

Because of the high demand and the limited inventory, many property owners will see higher assessed values this year. Notices will be mailed on April 1 to residential property owners. Commercial property owners will receive their valuation notices soon thereafter. Property owners may choose to protest their assessment. Instructions to file a protest are included in the appraisal notices and can be found at www.tad.org.

Property owners with residential homesteads will be protected from increases higher than 10 percent. Because of the appraisal cap limitation, appraised value used to determine homesteaded property taxes are limited to 10 percent appreciation.

Property appraisals are determined by TAD and used by local taxing units to calculate taxes, which pay for police and fire protection, public schools and hospitals, road and street maintenance, courts, water and sewer systems and other public services.

TAD Scores for Public Education

The Texas State Comptroller’s Office released the preliminary findings of its’ 2016 Property Value Study (PVS) on January 31, 2017, and all 21 Tarrant County school districts were found to be within the comptroller’s estimate of market value.

“We were informed by the Property Tax Assistance Division of the comptroller’s office that TAD’s 2016 property market values were valid,” said Jeff Law, Chief Appraiser of Tarrant Appraisal District. “As a result, these values will result in each school district receiving full state funding for public education.”

Texas funds public education through state and local funds. Local funding comes from property taxes.  The study conducted by the Comptroller is used by the Commissioner of Education to equalize the distribution of education funds provided by the State. This gives school districts about the same number of dollars to spend per student, regardless of the district’s property wealth.

The Comptroller’s Property Tax Assistance Division conducts a study every two years to estimate a school district’s total taxable value, and to determine whether those values meet appropriate levels of accuracy.

The secondary purpose of the Property Value Study is to measure appraisal district performance by determining the accuracy and uniformity of property tax appraisals. These measures indicate whether appraisal districts have appraised properties at 100 percent market value – the legally required level.

 “TAD is very pleased with the findings of the 2016 PVS,” said Randy Armstrong, Director of Residential at TAD. “This is very good news for our area schools and for TAD.”

Taxpayer ALERT regarding applications for Homestead Exemptions

The Tarrant Appraisal District is regularly contacted by homeowners who have unnecessarily paid money to solicitors who, for a fee, offer to file homestead exemption forms in Tarrant County.

We have found that the homeowners are being misled by letters or door to door solicitation from individuals or businesses that offer to help them apply for exemptions by signing an agreement giving these individuals or businesses half the recovered money.  The individual or businesses also require the homeowner to sign a form stating they are requesting to have their mailing address changed to the solicitor’s business address insuring they receive half the property owners refund if one is due.  Homeowners that change their mailing address will no longer receive tax statements, Notice of Appraised Value or any other correspondence mailed from the Tarrant Appraisal District, the Appraisal Review Board or the Tarrant County Tax Assessor Collectors office.

The Tarrant Appraisal District annually mails out applications for homestead exemptions in early January and there is no fee for filing an application.

If you have any questions, you may contact the Tarrant Appraisal District-Exemptions Division at (817) 284-4063, Monday – Friday from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m.

 
 

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Residential Protest Deadline will be on May 31st 2017 at 5:00 pm.

 

Please note:  May 31st is the protest deadline unless the notice of appraised value for your property was dated / mailed by TAD after May 1, 2017. The deadline for filing a timely protest is Wednesday, May 31, 2017, at 5:00 p.m. Central Daylight Time.  If you attempt to protest using eAccess at TAD.org but fail to receive an immediate protest confirmation by email, file a written notice of protest with the Tarrant Appraisal Review Board, PO BOX 185519, Fort Worth, TX 76181-0519, which must be postmarked no later than May 31, 2017, to preserve your rights to a hearing.  A hard copy protest form is printed on the reverse side of your notice of appraised value and an electronic version is available on this website.  Don’t wait until the last minute to file – technical difficulties that may be encountered at TAD.org due to website traffic will not extend the filing deadline.

Resolve Your 2017 Proposed Market Value

 

DID YOU KNOW…

…that you may be able to resolve the 2017 proposed market value of your property without having to attend a hearing? The “Discuss Your Value” option on TAD.org allows you to enter an opinion of market value for your property:

 

Your opinion of market value may be accepted or countered (though in some rare cases TAD may not be able to make you an offer online). If your market value is accepted, or if you accept the counter offer, your market value will be set to the agreed amount and you’re all done!

If your value is not accepted, or no counter offer is made, you do not need to do anything further – your protest is already on file with the Appraisal Review Board. You will be notified of your hearing date and time at least 15 days before the hearing. Please note that the “File a Protest” option only allows you to file a protest. Although you can enter an opinion of value, the system will not make a value offer.

For more information, please contact the Tarrant Appraisal District at (817) 284-3925.

Hot real estate market reflected in 2017 sales prices

According to recent sales data, Tarrant County continues to be one of the hottest real estate markets in the country, and Tarrant Appraisal District (TAD) officials are preparing local home owners for strong property valuations in 2017. 

New residents continue to flood into North Texas seeking jobs and the Texas lifestyle, which means homes are in high demand. When evaluating residential markets, the usual home inventory is about six months, according to the Texas A&M Real Estate Center. However, inventory levels in Tarrant County currently stand at less than two months.

Because of the high demand and the limited inventory, many property owners will see higher assessed values this year. Notices will be mailed on April 1 to residential property owners. Commercial property owners will receive their valuation notices soon thereafter. Property owners may choose to protest their assessment. Instructions to file a protest are included in the appraisal notices and can be found at www.tad.org.

Property owners with residential homesteads will be protected from increases higher than 10 percent. Because of the appraisal cap limitation, appraised value used to determine homesteaded property taxes are limited to 10 percent appreciation.

Property appraisals are determined by TAD and used by local taxing units to calculate taxes, which pay for police and fire protection, public schools and hospitals, road and street maintenance, courts, water and sewer systems and other public services.

TAD Scores for Public Education

The Texas State Comptroller’s Office released the preliminary findings of its’ 2016 Property Value Study (PVS) on January 31, 2017, and all 21 Tarrant County school districts were found to be within the comptroller’s estimate of market value.

“We were informed by the Property Tax Assistance Division of the comptroller’s office that TAD’s 2016 property market values were valid,” said Jeff Law, Chief Appraiser of Tarrant Appraisal District. “As a result, these values will result in each school district receiving full state funding for public education.”

Texas funds public education through state and local funds. Local funding comes from property taxes.  The study conducted by the Comptroller is used by the Commissioner of Education to equalize the distribution of education funds provided by the State. This gives school districts about the same number of dollars to spend per student, regardless of the district’s property wealth.

The Comptroller’s Property Tax Assistance Division conducts a study every two years to estimate a school district’s total taxable value, and to determine whether those values meet appropriate levels of accuracy.

The secondary purpose of the Property Value Study is to measure appraisal district performance by determining the accuracy and uniformity of property tax appraisals. These measures indicate whether appraisal districts have appraised properties at 100 percent market value – the legally required level.

 “TAD is very pleased with the findings of the 2016 PVS,” said Randy Armstrong, Director of Residential at TAD. “This is very good news for our area schools and for TAD.”

Taxpayer ALERT regarding applications for Homestead Exemptions

The Tarrant Appraisal District is regularly contacted by homeowners who have unnecessarily paid money to solicitors who, for a fee, offer to file homestead exemption forms in Tarrant County.

We have found that the homeowners are being misled by letters or door to door solicitation from individuals or businesses that offer to help them apply for exemptions by signing an agreement giving these individuals or businesses half the recovered money.  The individual or businesses also require the homeowner to sign a form stating they are requesting to have their mailing address changed to the solicitor’s business address insuring they receive half the property owners refund if one is due.  Homeowners that change their mailing address will no longer receive tax statements, Notice of Appraised Value or any other correspondence mailed from the Tarrant Appraisal District, the Appraisal Review Board or the Tarrant County Tax Assessor Collectors office.

The Tarrant Appraisal District annually mails out applications for homestead exemptions in early January and there is no fee for filing an application.

If you have any questions, you may contact the Tarrant Appraisal District-Exemptions Division at (817) 284-4063, Monday – Friday from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m.